Childbirth in Developing Countries: Risks and Strategies for Safe Delivery

Childbirth in Developing Countries: Risks and Strategies for Safe Delivery

January 29, 2024 by Etta-Atlantic
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Introduction:

Childbirth is a miraculous and life-changing event, but for many women living in developing countries, it can also be a life-threatening one. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that approximately 303,000 women die each year due to complications related to pregnancy and childbirth, with 99% of these deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries. This staggering number represents a huge disparity between the developed and developing world, where maternal mortality rates are 14 times higher. In this article, we will delve into the risks associated with childbirth in developing countries and discuss strategies for ensuring safe delivery for mothers and their newborns, with an emphasis on the most recent data available.

Risks associated with childbirth:

One of the primary risks associated with childbirth in developing countries is a lack of access to healthcare and trained professionals. In many parts of the world, mothers and their families do not have access to the healthcare services they need, including prenatal care, childbirth services, and postnatal care. This is due to a lack of healthcare providers and facilities, as well as cultural and social barriers that prevent mothers from accessing healthcare services. According to the WHO, only half of all women in low- and middle-income countries receive the minimum recommended amount of prenatal care, and just one in four women give birth in the presence of a skilled health professional.

  • Lack of access to emergency obstetric care:

Another risk associated with childbirth in developing countries is the lack of access to emergency obstetric care. This includes emergency caesarean sections, blood transfusions, and other life-saving interventions that are often not available in remote or rural areas. According to a study by the Guttmacher Institute, only 31% of births in low-income countries take place in a health facility, and just 10% of births in the poorest countries take place in a facility with comprehensive emergency obstetric care.

  • Cultural and social barriers

Cultural and social barriers also play a significant role in maternal health. In many cultures, traditional beliefs and practices can prevent mothers from accessing healthcare services, such as prenatal care or childbirth services. Additionally, social barriers, such as discrimination and stigma, can prevent mothers from seeking healthcare services. A study by UNICEF found that attitudes and practices related to gender, sexuality, and power dynamics can lead to discrimination against women and girls, making them less likely to seek care or advocate for their own needs.

 

Strategies for safe delivery:

  • Invest in training healthcare providerschildbirth, mother with her child in developing countries

One strategy for ensuring safe delivery for mothers and their newborns is to invest in training healthcare providers in emergency obstetric care and other essential skills. This includes training midwives and traditional birth attendants in emergency obstetric care, as well as training healthcare providers in infection prevention and control, neonatal resuscitation, and other essential skills. A study by the International Confederation of Midwives found that increasing the number of midwives in a community can lead to a reduction in maternal and neonatal deaths by as much as 45%.

  • Provide transportation for mothers in emergency situations

Another strategy is to provide transportation for mothers in emergency situations, as well as provide access to blood transfusions, antibiotics, and other life-saving interventions. The WHO estimates that up to 50% of maternal deaths can be prevented by providing access to emergency obstetric care and essential medicines.

In conclusion, childbirth in developing countries is a significant risk to the health and well-being of mothers and their newborns. The disparity in maternal mortality rates between developed and developing countries is a stark reminder of the urgent need for increased access to invest in strategies that increase access to healthcare and emergency obstetric care, as well as address cultural and social barriers to maternal health.

 

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Lekki, Lagos State
Nigeria

Call us now if you are in a medical emergency need, we will reply swiftly and provide you with a medical aid.


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Etta Atlantic Memorial Hospital Logo

22 Abioro Street, Ikate
Lekki, Lagos State
Nigeria

Call us now if you are in a medical emergency need, we will reply swiftly and provide you with a medical aid.


08083734008

hello@ettaatlantic.com


Visit us on social networks:

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